Home Network Progress; Backups and Servage

Been having some fun with my home network.  Fun finally, because it has been not fun at all for quite a while.  I’m now winning on both of my NAS devices, which is letting me feel a bit more optimistic about returning to a sensible backup flow.  Been sort of commando for several months now, and that’s not good.  If you’ve ever been stung by data loss, you know how important backups are.  But there’s a lot of real estate between knowing what you need and getting it to work.

My overall plan has been to do frequent backups to the first NAS, which I also want to serve content.  Then that thing should do weekly backups to a slow, bulletproof NAS.  The NAS-to-NAS backup has never worked.  I have never gotten to the point where it was possible.  I understand it may be difficult, but I’m at least to a point now where both of the NASs are accessible from all of my machines, save a bit of research on NAS-to-NAS of course.

My fast NAS (named “Tenshi”) is a WD My Book Live with 2TB total, and no RAID going on.  so 2TB, and I want to keep a great deal of that free for good luck, which is not a technical term, but will have to suffice.  After all, the objective is to avoid bad luck, which is catastrophic data loss.  Tenshi is where I would LIKE to have my iTunes library, which may still have to be managed by the MacBook Pro, a house-bound machine with a dead battery and a nearly full hard drive.  There’s nothing wrong with the machine other than the battery, and it’s still plenty powerful, but I could not get past some stage of beginner-ism with it, and hence have never really warmed up to actually using the darned thing.    More on the later.  but iTunes is difficult to run as a networked home media server. so i have come up with what I think will work: let the MBP run the library on the NAS from the point of view of making changes.  Let everybody else connect through the embedded iTunes server present on the NAS itself, in read-only.  The only issue I foresee is contention between the MBP and the NAS server for things like play counts.  Finally, I will make an “iTunes_Inbox” folder up on the NAS, and the MBP will watch that as its default “add the contents of this folder to the library”.  Then everything else will dump media into that folder.  This way, only the MBP instance of iTunes is updating the library, even if the media came in through my Amazon downloader on the Windows 7 box.

On both of the NASs, I tried to create role-oriented accounts (guest, itunes_user, macbackup, and so forth), but managing those things rapidly exceeded my give-a-darn, as when it got too complex, I just wiped them out and rebuilt.  At one point, I had forgotten how to log into my bulletproof slow NAS (“Shatura”), which had me stalled on this stuff for a long time.  Then in doing my homework, I learned that doing a factory reset on a Promise SmartStor NS2300N will NOT affect the data on the drives, just wipe out the user / group / admin configs.  Super!  Reset it was, and when I then saw “file system error” messages, I was pretty steamed.  But let’s face it; I was not about to manually backup all the stuff on there just in case a reset would hash it.  After all, that is the BACKUP itself, and I have never had enough confidence in it (that is, in my setup of the system) to remove unconsolidated versions of what I copied up to it.  And as this is supposed to be the slow backup of the backup, I felt that anything present there was already in hand elsewhere.  I knew I was never going to go to the trouble of actually verifying that, so the decision was either plunge ahead or give up altogether.

So plunge ahead it was, I did the reset, got the error messages, and then was relieved to learn that all it wanted was for me to issue the command to recover the RAID.  I used to know more about this stuff; now I just know that RAID 1 works quite well on my NAS.  Everything was there.  All I had to do was create a guest user, turn on Windows file sharing (Mac, Unix, FTP and other options are available as well), apply the sharing service to the recovered shares, and assign the guest user access to them.  Then went back to the Mac and the PC and taught them how to log in as that guest.  So there I am, up and running on both NASs, but with no clue how to automate a NAS-to-NAS weekly backup.  haven;t really done my homework on that yet; I’m sure it’s not rocket science.

About that MacBook Pro…

I’ve come largely off the Mac wagon, and while I still love the hardware and respect the tech, I’ve simply never felt at home on mac the way I did in the days of System 7.  That’s right, 8 was foreign, 9 was incomprehensible, and X should really be called about three different families of OS by now.  I loved Jaguar, which I think was 10.2, and I greatly like the 10.5 – 10.6 era.  I’m writing now from 10.6.8, but I’m coming to it using VNC Viewer from Real VNC, which I heartily recommend.  So while the MBP is running Chrome, through which I’m typing this on the blog, I’m actually typing physically on my hp Envy 14, which I adore, and which runs Windows 7, which is a high point for MS.

I have a MacBook Air, but it’s one of the early small ones, with a stunningly short battery life.  That wouldn’t be so bad except that there remain zero options for mobile power.  Once the chintzy little battery is exhausted, you cannot connect to an external battery, and you cannot swap in a fresh battery.  Sealed unit, Apple power only, put it back in the bag, you’re done.

WELL, I’m just rambling, and I do want to get back to my NAS project, so I’ll simply cut this off here.  I can’t tell you how much the prospect of success on the home server front has brightened my outlook.  Heck, I’m even writing again.  See?  There is a light at the end of the tunnel, and it is called regular backups.

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